Getting Wedding Day Ready

No other day about love, family, and togetherness requires this much planning, organization or stress.

For most of us, our wedding day has a ton of build-up. Childhood marathons of Cinderella and more recent binges of Say Yes To The Dress have taught us to care.

We all want to feel beautiful. We all want our guests to feel comfortable and accommodated.

When your to-do-list includes negotiating traditions, satisfying difficult family members, lodging out-of-town guests and managing food restrictions, it is easy to forget about the most important thing—you and yours.

You, yes you, deserve some time for self-love. Of course, this is easier said than done, so City Kitchen came up with a few suggestions to get you started.

  1. Watch a light and funny wedding movie. Stay away from plots with runaways and controlling in-laws.
  2. Lavender has relaxing properties. Drink some lavender tea or add lavender oil to a bubble bath (Make sure there is no dye, we don’t want to see anyone look like a new member of the blue man group for their big day!!!)
  3. The engagement might be one of the most stressful times for your relationship. Go back and recreate some of your first dates as a reminder of why you want a marriage and not just a wedding.
  4. Say thank you and encourage your maid of honor. You don’t want to stress out about giving your best friend a huge burden. You want them to feel recognized, special and appreciated.
  5. Sign up for City Kitchen’s Wedding Day Ready class, taking place on April 9th from 2-4pm.

During the class, Brides-to-be (and their tag-a-long maids of honor, MOTB, bridesmaids, and sisters) will learn ways to naturally detox and destress in order to look and feel their best on the big day through various holistic techniques! Click here to read more about the class and the relaxing homemade remedies you will get to take home.

 

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5 Reasons Your Family Should (Sometimes) Stick to Scratch

Betty Crocker and Duncan Hines may have their place in the kitchen, but when it comes to family time, sticking to scratch can have advantages. It can take more time or effort, but it is important for children to interact with their food.

It’s beautiful when your kids can see that a meal is greater than the sum of its parts– just like your family.

Ambrosia Food Group gave us 5 more reasons to consider ditching the mix when making food with your kids.

  1. More time = more bonding.

Recipes can be difficult. They can sometimes be hard to visualize or time exactly right. But what better way to bond as a family than to overcome a challenge?

Pro Parenting Tip: Are you mixing in ingredients one at a time? Are you creating the perfect gourmet sandwich? Start an assembly line and get the whole family involved! All of you will have contributed to the yummy finished product.

2. It is empowering.

Kids live a life of being told what to do and when to do it. Their food options are often dependent on when food is ready– or worse, they rely on the snack drawer full of processed food. Give your kids the ability to turn nothing into something. It is a lesson they can take far beyond the kitchen.

Pro Parenting Tip: It can be difficult, and it may not work with every child, but try making food shopping a treat for your kids.  Let them pick out a few vegetables on their own. This way, they will be more inclined to participate in the actual food preparation. They will be able to see something through from start to finish.

3. It makes math fun.

When your child goes to school, they will learn how to add, subtract, multiply and divide.  But doing these equations on a worksheet does not highlight real life application. When you prepare recipes at home, your children can double them, cut them in half or use a smaller measuring cup multiple times. If only every math problem had a final solution so yummy and delicious…

Pro Parenting Tip: If you have an ample amount of time and want to challenge your kids, try “losing” your bigger measuring devices like a cup or a tablespoon. Let your kid work through the math in their head.

4. Taste buds can fuel creativity.

School art and music programs are being cut left and right, but part of being a child is having access to creative expression. We all have to eat, so why not make the kitchen a canvas?

Pro Parenting Tip: In reality, you just aren’t going to cook every meal or every baked good from scratch. But that doesn’t mean you should give up on being creative.

Make sure you have ingredients like vanilla extract and cinnamon to add to your sweeter items.  For savory creations, let your child add a small amount of fresh herbs and spices. These little tips will help make boxed items seem, well, less boxed.

5. Julia Childs said, “no one is born a great cook, one learns by doing.”

Sometimes we fail. It is human. But in the kitchen, every mistake is a lesson for next time.

*****Super Pro Parenting Tip***** : Sign your child up for an Ambrosia Kid’s Sunday cooking class. It is a social and educational way to jump start your child’s passion for food.

 

Kid’s Classes run every other Sunday and are available for children aged 6-11 and 12-16. Join us April 10th for our chocolate making classes! 

Kids in the Kitchen

Cooking with kids is not just about ingredients, recipes and cooking. It’s about harnessing imagination, empowerment and creativity. — Guy Fieri

Some of us remember helping in the kitchen as a kid. We remember the messes and the smells and the tastes– and the love.

Others may not have such experiences. The kitchen may bring flashbacks of worried warnings: “beware of this and don’t touch that!”

Regardless of our backgrounds, we all hope to instill our children with important life skills. Nothing could be as important as fostering a love and respect for food.

Real life prevents us from including our kids in every meal. Sometimes we just need to get the chicken in. the. oven.

City Kitchen is running a series of Sunday cooking classes for kids. This is the perfect opportunity to encourage childhood independence and enrich the entire family’s passion for food– while making the mess in someone else’s kitchen…

Want to learn more?  Join City Kitchen this Sunday for our Meet, Greet & Eat to get to know the chefs from Ambrosia Kitchen and snack on some delicious samples.

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Spreading Valentine’s Day Love Throughout The Year

Love may be the main dish, but February 14th usually comes with sides of stress and questioning.

Should we go to the same white tablecloth restaurant again? Can we afford a weekend away? Is this gift too much or not enough?

The days of being satisfied with a bouquet or a box are long over. Holidays are about memories. So, City Kitchen at the Reading Terminal Market planned a Valentine’s Day event that turned out to be one for the (cook) books.

On February 13, or shall we say Valentine’s Eve, City Kitchen hosted a 5 course meal.City Kitchen Valentine's Day Menu

Reading Terminal Market’s own Jack McDavid, chef and owner of Down Home Diner, prepared this elegant and delicious menu. Caviar, quail and exquisite oysters tickled the tastebuds of the guests, but it was the rustic sausage balls that won the crowd favorite.

Jack was kind to give a brief history of The Reading Terminal and its significance to this City of Love.

While Valentine’s Day is a popular (and important!) time to show our love, we shouldn’t forget to extend this feeling throughout the year. A City Kitchen cooking class is the perfect way to cook up some memories, regardless of the date on the calendar.

 

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