Cheers! to Fresh & Fun Cocktails

Summertime means fresh, delicious produce and bright, colorful meals! It comes with more amazing, in-season produce that can be grown locally.

It feels really good to understand the history of our food and the routes of our produce. This knowledge helps feed our soul rather than just our belly.

It helps explain why the farm-to-table movement is a movement rather than just a fad.

The farm-to-table mentality has crossed over to other industries. Cosmetic, medicinal, and even local soap companies are launching seasonal products using pronounceable ingredients!

Terralyn, of Terralyn Naturally, used mint and mint tea to create her beautiful Mint Gabrielle Handcrafted Soap. Trust us, you want to smell this.

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Contact Terralyn at terralynmanteau@gmail.com

So supper time and shower time have embraced the outlook that natural-is-better. But what about what is really important? Alcohol.

Cocktails can embrace the farm-to-table (or ground-to-glass) mentality too.

City Kitchen at Reading Terminal Market will be hosting Aaron Gordon, owner of 13th Street Cock­tails on Thursday, August 25 from 5-7 to walk us through how to make delicious, fresh cocktails using the best ingredients from Iovine Brother’s Produce.

Each participant will have their own mixing station to practice making some of Aaron’s signa­ture cocktails. Sign up for our class, and you will really know what you are doing the next time you make a cocktail.

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We will be using the very smooth and delicious Tito’s vodka as the base spirit. Light fare will be served to complement your mixed libations. Each guest will receive a hand juicer and recipe guide to take home. Reserve your space here. Guests will be asked to show I.D. at the door.

Notes on Recipes & Cookbooks

Recipes & Cookbooks

Cookbooks are collections of recipes. But what makes a good cookbook? Here are some of our tips when it comes to identifying a valuable cookbook.

A good cookbook is one you aren’t afraid to use. 

While high-quality pictures and glossy paper are ideal for coffee table books, a cookbook needs to be able to take some heat. Literally.

A good cookbook includes different cuisines and flavors.

A go-to Italian or French or Chinese cookbook certainly has its place, but every home needs a cookbook that incorporates different styles of food. Novelty plays a big part in being excited to cook and to eat.

A good cookbook accounts for access. 

Today, we have access to more ingredients than ever before. Still, a cookbook should account for regional and seasonal changes. A really good cookbook will help you find specialty ingredients not available in basic supermarkets.

A good cookbook has a narrative. 

A cookbook can read more like a novel when the author connects the recipe to a time or place. When creating new recipes, with new flavors and ingredients, you get the opportunity to be part of the storytelling.

And of course, a good cookbook has yummy recipes. 

The Reading Terminal Market Cookbook has all of these elements. It is easy to use and read. It incorporates different flavors and cuisines and tells the story of the historic Reading Terminal Market.

An amazing cookbook comes with a live demonstration class. 

On June 2, join authors Ann Hazan and Irina Smith in City Kitchen to learn how to prepare Market favorites from their new edition of The Reading Terminal Market Cookbook.

Samples include appetizer, soup, salad, entree and dessert. Whether for a family dinner or entertaining friends, Ann and Irina will take you step by step in preparing an impressive and delicious menu. An autographed Reading Terminal Market Cookbook is included in class price.

Tickets are available now

Kids in the Kitchen

Cooking with kids is not just about ingredients, recipes and cooking. It’s about harnessing imagination, empowerment and creativity. — Guy Fieri

Some of us remember helping in the kitchen as a kid. We remember the messes and the smells and the tastes– and the love.

Others may not have such experiences. The kitchen may bring flashbacks of worried warnings: “beware of this and don’t touch that!”

Regardless of our backgrounds, we all hope to instill our children with important life skills. Nothing could be as important as fostering a love and respect for food.

Real life prevents us from including our kids in every meal. Sometimes we just need to get the chicken in. the. oven.

City Kitchen is running a series of Sunday cooking classes for kids. This is the perfect opportunity to encourage childhood independence and enrich the entire family’s passion for food– while making the mess in someone else’s kitchen…

Want to learn more?  Join City Kitchen this Sunday for our Meet, Greet & Eat to get to know the chefs from Ambrosia Kitchen and snack on some delicious samples.

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Spreading Valentine’s Day Love Throughout The Year

Love may be the main dish, but February 14th usually comes with sides of stress and questioning.

Should we go to the same white tablecloth restaurant again? Can we afford a weekend away? Is this gift too much or not enough?

The days of being satisfied with a bouquet or a box are long over. Holidays are about memories. So, City Kitchen at the Reading Terminal Market planned a Valentine’s Day event that turned out to be one for the (cook) books.

On February 13, or shall we say Valentine’s Eve, City Kitchen hosted a 5 course meal.City Kitchen Valentine's Day Menu

Reading Terminal Market’s own Jack McDavid, chef and owner of Down Home Diner, prepared this elegant and delicious menu. Caviar, quail and exquisite oysters tickled the tastebuds of the guests, but it was the rustic sausage balls that won the crowd favorite.

Jack was kind to give a brief history of The Reading Terminal and its significance to this City of Love.

While Valentine’s Day is a popular (and important!) time to show our love, we shouldn’t forget to extend this feeling throughout the year. A City Kitchen cooking class is the perfect way to cook up some memories, regardless of the date on the calendar.

 

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